Posts Tagged 'Camille Pissarro'



The Camille Pissarro Rose

Camille Pissarro Rose

Camille Pissarro Rose

There is a rose named for Camille Pissarro.  It was bred by G. Delbard in France in 1996. It is a glorious flower with yellow, pink, and cream stripes.  The one in the picture was part of a small bouquet given to me a few years ago.

Info from: http://nixpixmix.blogspot.com/2012/04/camille-pissaro-rose.html

PISSARRO Exhibition Moves to Barcelona October 15!

The Hermitage Road at Pontoise, 1874 Musée d’Orsay, Paris   PDR349

The Hermitage Road at Pontoise, 1874
Musée d’Orsay, Paris PDR349

This charming landscape by Camille Pissarro was featured in the PISSARRO exhibition in Madrid.  Perhaps it will also be included at the CaixaForum in Barcelona when the PISSARRO exhibition opens there on October 15.

Some of Pissarro’s paintings look deceptively simple—and this is a perfect example! The top third of the canvas is filled with grayish clouds and the lower two-thirds are green fields. A horse and buggy provide a pleasant focal point just off center.

So how do you explain the intrinsic sense of movement, steady as a pulse, that drives the action in the painting. It is only paint on canvas, but you really believe that the buggy is moving forward at a brisk clip. You know that the man on the left will meet the two women walking towards him, and that the tiny buggy on the hillside road will soon disappear from sight.

Underlying these believable elements is a dramatic geometric form—a large lazy Z figure that appears on the horizon just left of center (look for the tiny buggy), makes a sharp angle around the three tall poplar trees, and almost disappears at the left foreground before it forms the bottom of the letter leading to the two women.  In a landscape that appears soft and curvy, this large Z is decidedly sharp and angular, dividing the fields into separate sections.

As if to heighten the excitement, Pissarro works each section in a different manner. Look closely at the space beneath the main road in the foreground. It is divided into four sections of grass, each of them different shades of green, and a small yellowish bridge.  The section between the bottom of the Z and the strong diagonal from left to right  includes six or seven different sections with small dark green trees at the top right edge of the canvas.  The section between the top of the Z and the diagonal is mostly a rosy beige with patches of green but is bordered on the left by darker green. A mysterious pale green band leads our eyes to the three tall poplars at the angle. The distant space above the second road going up the hill appears to be rocky fields defined by a narrow line of tiny green trees on the horizon. Even the sky seems to be doing its part, with the dark clouds scudding away quickly leaving lighter, brighter skies near the horizon.

All the movement is grounded by the prominent arch of the small bridge in the right lower corner of the canvas. It is reflected in the rocks just to the left highlighted by the small white arrow formed by the road’s surface. The stability of the view is also anchored by the presence of a herd of sheep with their shepherd far in the distance just above the woman’s white cap.

Pissarro’s paintings are often subtle. They don’t scream at you with clashing colors and jagged edges, but a careful look reveals many intricate features and very often surprises.

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PISSARRO’S PLACES,

the book about all the locations Pissarro painted,

 will be available in Barcelona at the CaixaForum bookstore.

www.pissarrosplaces.com

And the days grow shorter…for PISSARRO in Madrid

The Woods at Marly, 1871 Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

The Woods at Marly, 1871
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

ONLY A FEW DAYS LEFT…. to see the PISSARRO exhibition in Madrid before it closes on September 15.

With this gorgeous painting from Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza’s own collection, we express our gratitude to the museum and to Guillermo Solano, the museum’s artistic director, for creating this incredible exhibition of Pissarro’s paintings.  To be able to see these matchless paintings in this instructive context has enriched us and left us with a deeper understanding of the artist’s innovative genius.

The Good News is that on October 14, the PISSARRO exhibition will open in Barcelona at the CaixaForum, where it will remain until January 26, 2014.

The Woods at Marly gives us a hint of the autumn to come. The road through the trees is covered with golden leaves, yet some of the trees are still green.  Streaming through the branches, the sun makes a bright patch on the ground. The limbs of the trees meet overhead forming a succession of arches like the aisle of a Gothic cathedral. A lovely picture, indeed.

Our movement down the road is marked by people–at the left edge, a woman bends to her task. About midway to the clearing are two women, one of them carrying a bundle of wood. Beyond the green grassy area, there appears to be another woman standing near a pond. Our eyes are drawn to the shiny reflection of light on water, which is much too small to be a real focal point. If that image were in the center, this painting would be almost symmetrical.  But it’s not–it’s just to the left. And no matter how hard we try, we cannot look at the true center because our view is blocked by three dark tree trunks near the two women.

The tiny image itself is almost like a miniature painting on an old-fashioned brooch. It forces the rest of the canvas to serve as its frame. If we look closely at the little pond, we begin to see dark green brush strokes on each side that define a small diamond shape.  Beyond the pond are two trees with green branches reaching up to another diamond shape of dark green leaves, a bold contrast to the shiny diamond.

True, the diamond shapes are only approximate, but they are distinct. This shows how early Pissarro was concerned with geometric forms, again pushing ahead of his contemporaries by enclosing abstract shapes in figurative paintings. This breathtaking painting of the woods on a sunny autumn day is so much more than just a pretty picture. Perhaps Pissarro hides these tiny treasures in the dense woods, just wondering if we will find them.

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PISSARRO, the exhibition

CaixaForum, Barcelona

October 15, 2013 – January 26, 2014

PISSARRO’S PLACES, the book, is still available in the bookstore at Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza.  It will also be available in the bookstore of the CaixaForum in Barcelona when the PISSARRO exhibition opens.

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ARTBOOKANNEX.com….After a year and a half

PEOPLE WORLDWIDE love Pissarro and enjoy his paintings.

In these 549 days, there have been 4003 views from 78 countries on six continents–that’s an average of 7.3 views per day!  To all of you who love Pissarro, THANK YOU.

INTRODUCING THE NEW PISSARRO PAINTING AT PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART

pmacropApple Tree in the Meadow, Eragny
1893 — PDR 995

This stunning painting, a gift to the museum from John C. Haas and Chara C. Haas, is part of a new exhibition called First Look: Collecting for Philadelphia, a selection of 125 pieces from more than 8500 works of art donated to PMA over the last five years.

At first glance, it seems to be a simple painting.  There is the obvious focal point, an apple tree in full leaf with perhaps a few blossoms left, suggesting early summer.  The bright blue sky is cloudless, rather unusual since most of the Eragny paintings made that summer have puffy white clouds. The brilliant sunlight fades the green of the grass in the meadow. It must have been a calm day—the tree shows no sign of wind or breezes.  Pissarro set his easel in the meadow facing the tall white fence that separates the house, and front garden from the orchard. This painting was made the year after the Pissarro family purchased the house at Eragny.

But very little with Pissarro is ever simple, and neither is this picture. The brilliant sunlight creates purple shadows making patterns on the ground. We do not know what caused the shadows—a typical Pissarro mystery. The painting consists of horizontal bands with a perpendicular tree trunk, but wait!  The right edges of those shadows create a strong diagonal line, and there’s more. Follow the diagonal of the roof line down through the thickest part of the tree to the small object in the right foreground. Another diagonal hidden in the elements of the painting! It appears that Pissarro put that object there just to complete the diagonal and give strength to the composition.  But what is that object?

detail crop

A short post, perhaps. The wall behind it is about six feet tall, so it couldn’t be more than two or three feet high. A very close look (see the detail) reveals characteristics of a figure. (For a reality check, I asked a friend what she saw, and she immediately answered, “a woman.”) In fact, the figure, painted with very few brush strokes appears to be a woman in a blue dress with a red and white kerchief on her hair, holding a basket. If so, she is a very small scale compared to other elements in the painting. Of course, she could be a small garden statue, though I would not expect one to look like a maid. We know why Pissarro put the object in that place (to complete the diagonal line), but we do not know what! It is just another of the many puzzles that can be found in Pissarro’s paintings.

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 You can see it for yourself on the PMA website: http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/319041.html?mulR=5031|1.  In the lower right hand corner of the painting, click on the magnifying glass and you can study the details of the painting. Notice the tiny brushstrokes and the mixture of colors. When you zoom in on the object, press CTL and + at the same time to magnify it even more.  Leave me a comment and let me know what you think it is!

Photos were taken by the author (with the museum guard’s permission and no flash) on my Iphone.

 

 

 

 

PISSARRO–Madrid’s Exhibition–An Extraordinary Experience

Essen snowfall

Chemin des Creux, Louveciennes, Snow, 1872, PDR 219

Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany

This incredibly beautiful Pissarro landscape from Louveciennes was one of the major highlights of PISSARRO, the exhibition at Museum Thyssen Bornemisza in Madrid. This reproduction, taken from the Museum Folkwang’s website does not do it justice. The weak winter sunlight provides little warmth on the gleaming white snow, with its shades of blue and pink. The deep shadows are delicate shadings of blues, grays, mauves. The old tree’s rotten center is filled with snow and your eye gets lost in the graceful tangle of small branches.

The entire exhibition, which began with Pissarro’s last self-portrait, was as carefully composed as one of his paintings–arranged chronologically, many times in pairs that enhanced the experience of each work. While the selection of 79 paintings included many well-known paintings, there were also some delightful surprises.

The museum’s own Route de Versailles was carefully paired with a similar painting from the High Museum in Atlanta. Two of Pissarro’s most beautiful paintings from London 1871 were together, the field near Sydenham Hill and Dulwich College. Two landscapes of l’Hermitage at Pontoise were similar locations but displayed strikingly different techniques. Another exceptionally wide painting of 1877 from Ottawa, Canada, displayed a composition that is sparse and modern-looking for its time.

A pair of very wide landscapes, two very different versions of the crooked apple tree in Pissarro’s orchard, similar views of the garden wall were among the paintings from Eragny.

Imagine my surprise when I saw the two paintings from Pitti Palace in Florence that I wrote about a few months ago. What a treat to see them again, this time close up and at eye level.

The city views featured two versions of Boulevard Montmartre paintings, the museum’s own Rue Saint-Honore paired with the same motif from Copenhagen. An exquisite selection of Rouen paintings featured the bridges, the Seine, the boats and the changeable weather.

Mind you, these galleries were not hushed and quiet, and people did not parade around the room in a slow shuffle like they usually do.  There was an excited buzz in the air as people looked first at one and then the other and then back again. Some visitors were going back into previous rooms to compare earlier and later works, or landscapes with cityscapes. Viewers were spending time in front of paintings, looking closely, walking up to see brushstrokes and back to embrace the unity.

Pissarro must be smiling.

PISSARRO’S PLACES is on sale in the bookstore of the PISSARRO exhibition in Madrid.  I had the honor of signing books for several people who bought them on the day I was there.  What a pleasure to meet each of them and share thoughts about Pissarro.

Readers of this blog can obtain a copy of PISSARRO’S PLACES at Amazon.com or the Barnes & Noble website.  A special price for friends of this blog is available at the book’s website:  http://www.pissarrosplaces.com.

PISSARRO IN NEW YORK AT THE FRICK

frick-2 Boulevard de Rochechouart, 1880

Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts

Pissarro seems to be everywhere this year–in Madrid at Museo Thyssen Bornemiszo, in Le Havre as part of the Normandie Impressionist Festival, and in this one work which is part of an exhibition at the Frick. PISSARRO’S PLACES are everywhere!
This work is not featured in the book, PISSARRO’S PLACES.  Take this marvelous opportunity to see it in person. Photos are never as good!
The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec: Drawings and Prints from the Clark, March 12, 2013 to June 16, 2013
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A CLOSER LOOK
This beautiful pastel, Boulevard de Rochechouart, by Camille Pissarro deserves to be better known. This street is in the 9th arrondisement, an extension of the Boulevard de Clichy. He knew that area  well because his pied-a-terre in Paris was located in the 18th just a few blocks north. He was living there with Julie and his  family that winter.
What is interesting is that this work on paper was done relatively early in Pissarro’s career, in 1880. This is 13 years before Pissarro started his series of paintings in Paris.  Yet in this one, he seems to be looking down on the street as he did in 1893 at Place du Havre. It would seem to be a foreshadowing of his work to come.
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Here is an interesting perspective as noted in Art Daily of March 12 (See URL below for the whole story):

PISSARRO CHALLENGES NOTIONS OF FINISH Like Millet, Camille Pissarro spent much of his career depicting peasants and unembellished scenes of rural life, although the urban cityscape seized his imagination as well. His large pastel Boulevard de Rochechouart depicts a slice of Paris in the years following Baron Haussman’s renewal of the city. For the writers and artists of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the pulse and rhythm of the grands boulevards symbolized modernity, as eloquently expressed in Baudelaire’s famous essay of 1863 “Peintre de la Vie Moderne.” Through hatched, unblended strokes in a multitude of colors, Pissarro achieves a sense of transparency that captures the shifting sensations of a city in constant flux. His high viewpoint plunges the viewer into the melee of a tree-lined place, with carriages and omnibuses circulating and pedestrians dispersing into the streets. These anonymous urban dwellers dressed in dark clothing are mere blurs in the lively milieu, a world away from Millet’s monumental figure who commands the space of his environment. Although the pastel appears closer to a sketch than a completed work, Pissarro deliberately challenged accepted notions of finish. He signed and dated the sheet and exhibited it as an independent work alongside his paintings and smaller drawings in the Sixth Impressionist Exhibition of 1881.

More Information: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=11&int_new=61243#.UT9-kVegv0c[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

PISSARRO AND THE PORTS–MORE INFORMATION PER REQUEST

seine at rouen saint sever The Seine at Rouen, Saint Sever, 1896, Musee d’Orsay, Paris, PDR 1122

 One of our readers requested more information about the Pissarro exhibition at Le Havre.  Here you are.  For more details: http://www.normandie-impressionniste.eu/node/6

Pissarro and the Ports – Rouen, Dieppe, Le Havre

Musée d’Art moderne André Malraux – Le Havre

27 April–29 September 2013

“The full dimension of the port motif was realized by Camille Pissarro in an important series of three Norman ports, Rouen, Dieppe and Le Havre, that he worked on between 1883 and 1903.

“The exhibition “Pissarro in the Ports” will bring together for the first time thirty or so of these works, most of which have been loaned from public and private collections abroad. Works by Eugène Boudin and Maxime Maufra will complement the set. The exhibition will end with works that are almost contemporary with those of Pissarro, and demonstrate the extent of the rupture that occurred in painting in the first years of the twentieth century.”

Musée d’art moderne André Malraux

2 Boulevard Clemenceau

76 600 Le Havre

Le Havre is reached easily by car or by a short train ride from Paris or Rouen. See  www.sncf.com/en/passengers for more information.

PISSARRO’S PLACES — BOLD EXPERIMENT!!

pont factories

How will this painting* look in PISSARRO’S PLACES?

We’re not sure…..Here’s why….

Camille Pissarro constantly pushed the limits of painting and embraced most things modern (except the Eiffel Tower).  So I think he would approve of this.

PISSARRO’S PLACES will be the first book with fine art reproductions to be produced by the digital “PRINT ON DEMAND” production technique. (Based on checks with industry executives) It includes:

35 reproductions of Pissarro paintings

46 current photographs of the places he painted

29 historic postcards

Several family photographs and a few historic photos of Paris

Traditional publishers would not take on this 150-page book because it might not be profitable in today’s business environment. Self-publishing is the solution—for many authors in all categories.

My publisher is Art Book Annex—that’s right, my blog is publishing my book in print! Thankfully, my public relations background left me with decades of experience working with editors, designers and printers. PISSARRO’S PLACES has been professionally edited and professionally designed.

The printing will be done by Lightning Source, a company of Ingram Content Group, the world’s largest and most trusted distributor of physical and digital content.  They provide books, music and media content to over 38,000 retailers, libraries, schools and distribution partners in 195 countries and work with more than 25,000 publishers.

Lightning Source provides digital print production, also called “Print on Demand,” which means that using the computer files I supply to them, they can print any number of copies as they are needed—even just one copy.

The risk lies in the quality of the reproductions. This new technique is nothing like the complicated printing used for exhibition catalogues, and the paper will not be heavy and shiny. But I’ve examined their sample books with photography and illustrations, and I’ve consulted with design and printing experts.  We believe it will work.

Stay tuned, and hear the results when I get the first proof!!

*This beautiful painting is Factory on the Banks of the Oise, Saint-Ouen-l’Aumône, painted by Pissarro in 1873. It can be seen at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, PA.  The catalogue raisonne number is PDR 300. It will be in the chapter on Pontoise in PISSARRO’S PLACES.

 

Pontoise in the Snow as Pissarro Saw It

Rue de Gisors

Rue de Gisors, Effect of Snow, Pontoise, 1873

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA  PDR* 284

The overnight snowfall was still evident as Pissarro set up his easel on the side of the road. Just to the right of the two-wheeled cart, we can easily see the corner of the street where Pissarro lived.

The people of the village are busy with their daily errands as a woman sweeps snow off the sidewalk. Pissarro gives us an accurate sense of the gentle downward slope of the road with the decreasing levels of the rooftops. Even though the dominant colors of the painting are warm pinks and mauves, the cold crispness of the air suggested by the white snow on the roofs is intense.

This scene has hardly changed at all since Pissarro painted it. The pink building now has three stories, but the smaller buildings on that side are still the same and the tall angled roof is still there although it does not seem nearly as high as he portrayed it.

Rue de Gisors today

 This painting is one of 30 featured in the upcoming book,

 PISSARRO’S PLACES.

*PDR refers to the number assigned to this painting in Pissarro:Critical Catalogue by Joachim Pissarro and Claire Durand-Ruel Shollaerts (2005).

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Vermeer or a Pissarro?

Old Peasant Woman Seated, Moret
1902, PDR 1428
El Museu de Montserrat, Abbey of Montserrat
Catalonia, Spain

At first glance, this painting seems to be more characteristic of Vermeer than Pissarro.  The only source of light is the small unadorned window set deep into the wall.  The illumination is bright as a spotlight, casting dark shadows on the floor.  However, most of the women in Vermeer’s paintings were nicely dressed and lived in well-appointed surroundings. In contrast, Pissarro paints an old peasant woman, an apron over her full skirt and a scarf on her head. Vermeer’s subjects are busy doing something–reading a letter, holding a balance.  Pissarro’s subject sits quietly in the straight wooden chair, hands folded in her lap. How did this strange Pissarro painting come to be?

When Camille Pissarro went to visit his son Georges in 1902 at Moret-sur-Loing, just south of Paris, he hoped to paint outdoors. However, that May was unusually rainy and he decided to work indoors.  As he wrote his wife Julie, “It’s been windy, cold, and rainy ever since I arrived… but in spite of this setback, I have some reason to be pleased with my work. I found some peasants—two women and an old man who were willing to pose for me at their place.”

The people had been wine growers until a disease wiped out all the vineyards around Moret and left them in poverty. Pissarro painted the old man sitting at the same table, an opened bottle of wine in front of him.  Thankfully for Pissarro, the rain went away and he painted some of his most beautiful landscapes of the bridge and printing plant on the Loing River. These sites were also painted by another Impressionist, Alfred Sisley, who lived in Moret until his death in 1899, two years before Pissarro’s first visit to Moret in 1901.

Information and the quote from Pissarro’s letter are from Pissarro: Critical Catalogue of Paintings (2005) by Joachim Pissarro and Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts.

Many thanks to the Satalof family for spotting this Pissarro at Monserrat last summer and bringing it to my attention.

 


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