Posts Tagged 'Pissarro’s Places'

PISSARRO AT THE MUSEE D’ORSAY IN PARIS–OF COURSE!

Bac à la Varenne-Saint-Hilaire 1864 Musee d'Orsay

Bac à la Varenne-Saint-Hilaire
1864
Musee d’Orsay

 

Today I was at the Orsay, and I counted 19 paintings by Camille Pissarro on view.  This is more than I remember at any other time. The Orsay has approximately 60 paintings by Pissarro, yet they generally have shown the same ones, usually less than 10. All of those were on display today, but there were many others which usually are not shown. 

The one shown above, Barge at La Vareen Saint-Hillaire, is unfamiliar to me and I suspect to most other Pissarro fans. It is a very early painting, 1864. made ten years before the first Impressionist Exhibition.  Already you can see that Pissarro was rebelling against the academic structure of the Salon. 

This painting is tiny by any measure, only 16.1 x 10.6 inches.  It would have never been able to complete with large Salon paintings and clearly was not meant to.  In fact, it was probably painting en plain air, on the actual site.  The paint is applied in thick brushstrokes, which are clearly visible—another push against academia which favored smooth finishes with invisible brushstrokes. The motif is a landscape, which depicts a very ordinary scene with people at their daily activities.  This also countered the Salon’s preference for paintings depicting history, myths, or important events.

The painting shows a barge crossing the Marne river, carrying a horse and carriage.  The river is obviously very still because we can see the reflections of the barge and its passengers in the water.  It may be the quiet before the storm given the dark clouds overhead. At the left is another smaller boat with its passengers either ready to depart or just landing.  On the opposite bank, we see the hill rising from the river with a town at its crest.

La Vareen Saint-Hillaire, southeast of Paris, is an old town on the Marne river. An abbey was established there in 639 AD, and in the 16th century, a castle was built. The ancient abbey was destroyed during the French Revolution. This painting was made in 1864, six years before the Franco-Prussian War which was particularly harsh on this little village.

This painting shows that even before the Impressionist movement, Pissarro was in the vanguard of opposition to the strictures of the Salon. He led the way toward new ways of seeing color and motifs and new painting techniques.

You can view the painting on the Orsay’s website at this website; however, their digital photo does not allow you to enlarge the photo very much for close examination. 

http://www.musee-orsay.fr/en/collections/index-of-works/resultat-collection.html?no_cache=1&zoom=1&tx_damzoom_pi1%5Bzoom%5D=0&tx_damzoom_pi1%5BxmlId%5D=000398&tx_damzoom_pi1%5Bback%5D=en%2Fcollections%2Findex-of-works%2Fresultat-collection.html%3Fno_cache%3D1%26zsz%3D9

A young artist studying Pissarro

A young artist studying Pissarro

Pissarro would love this little girl who was diligently copying one of his paintings.  He taught his own children to draw at an early age and most of them became artists whose paintings are in the collection of the Musee d’Orsay (though they are rarely if ever seen). To her credit, she chose an especially hard painting to reproduce. Since this was midway in her copy book, she probably has already worked on many other paintings.  (I wasn’t the only one attracted by her concentration. Without her knowledge, a circle of admiring adults were watching, taking pictures, but being careful not to interrupt her.)

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HELLO TO READERS

A few weeks ago, one European reader came on this blog and read 69 postings in one day!  Since I have no way to know who you are, I just want to say THANK YOU for your interest in Pissarro and for visiting this blog.  Many readers log on the blog and read several posts, and others perhaps come more often to check out what is new.

When I last checked the statistics, there were readers in more than 70 countries and on six continents. (I guess Antarctica does not have any Pissarro fans.) To all of you, sincere thanks for your interest in Pissarro and for reading this blog.

Some readers have told me that they had difficulty posting comments to the blog. The intricacies of this website are beyond me, but I would definitely like to hear from you. Here is an email address by which you can reach me directly. 

annsaul@pissarrosplaces.com

I would love to hear your comments.  If you would like me to post your comments, please let me know.  Otherwise, i will keep your remarks private.  I look forward to hearing from you.

Ann Saul

Author of PISSARRO’S PLACES

Blog:  artbookannex.com

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PISSARRO’S PLACES

The book is available at www.pissarrosplaces.com. There is a special discount available for those who visit the website.  It is also available on Amazon.

PISSARRO’S PLACES in Barcelona–11 November

promo cover

PISSARRO’S PLACES will be the center of attention when I give my slide-lecture at the EXCELLENCE Bookstore in Barcelona, Spain on 11 November at 11:30 in the morning.  This prominent bookstore is partnering with the Barcelona Women’s Network to sponsor the program.  They will offer the book for the remainder of the PISSARRO exhibition at the CaixaForum. If you are in Barcelona, make plans to join us!

PISSARRO’S PLACES

Slide-lecture by Ann Saul

EXCELLENCE Bookstore, C/Balmes, 191,Barcelona

11 November, 11:30 am

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ON A DAY LIKE TODAY, FRENCH PAINTER CAMILLE PISSARRO WAS BORN

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THIS ARTICLE APPEARED TODAY IN THE ART DAILY NEWSLETTER.

July 10, 1830.- Camille Pissarro (10 July 1830 – 13 November 1903) was a French Impressionist and Neo-Impressionist painter born on the island of St Thomas (now in the US Virgin Islands, but then in the Danish West Indies). His importance resides in his contributions to both Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. Pissarro studied from great forerunners, including Gustave Courbet and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. He later studied and worked alongside Georges Seurat and Paul Signac when he took on the Neo-Impressionist style at the age of 54. In this image: An unidentified visitor looks at an impressionist painting by Camille Pissarro called the Rue Saint-Honore apre-midi, Rue Saint-Honore Afternoon, Rain Effect, in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, Thursday May 12, 2005.

The book PISSARRO’S PLACES is available in the bookstore of the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum.

 

 

NEW WEBSITE — PISSARRO’S PLACES

promo cover

The new website for PISSARRO’S PLACES is now live on the web!  Check it out and let us know what you think.

http://www.pissarrosplaces.com

There is a link on the website for your comments and we look forward to hearing from you.

Will you be in Paris on May 22?  If so, please accept this invitation to hear Ann Saul talk about

 PISSARRO’S PLACES

in a slide-lecture presentation at 7:30 at

The American Library in Paris

10 Rue du Général Camou  75007 Paris

PISSARRO’S PLACES

is honored to be one of the official publications of the

NORMANDIE IMPRESSIONNISTE FESTIVAL OF 2013

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PISSARRO’S PLACES — Announcing the book launch!

6. PONTOISE d.pdf - Adobe Acrobat Professional

PISSARRO’S PLACES tells his story in a fresh and different way—exploring the places he painted and his “sensations” as he translated them into brushstrokes on his canvas. In his landscapes, you almost feel the sun and the wind in the trees. In his city paintings, you sense the hustle and bustle of traffic. This was his genius.

Rather than settling for the familiar, Pissarro courageously put himself into new situations in pursuit of different and exciting motifs. With PISSARRO’S PLACES, you see those places through his eyes. All the paintings featured in the book are located in public museums and are accessible to the public.

“I thought I knew every nook and cranny of Pissarro’s varied relations throughout the world, but you’ve just taught us there are many places we had missed, so many details we had not seen.”  Joachim Pissarro, great-grandson of Camille Pissarro and preeminent art historian

Visit the website to learn more about PISSARRO’S PLACES!   http://www.pissarrosplaces.com  (After 4/10/13)

 The regular list price is $39.99.

For the book launch until June 1, the price will be $29.99.

 

You can also order the book by emailing pissarrosplaces@gmail.com

or by writing Ann Saul, 225 S. 18th Street, Unit 510, Philadelphia, PA 19103.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PISSARRO’S PLACES ARE IN NORMANDY THIS SUMMER!!

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                   OF COURSE, you say.  Everyone knows that Pissarro painted in Rouen, Le Havre, and Dieppe, all of them in the heart of Normandy!!  But this is 2013 and there’s more! 

PISSARRO’S PLACES has just been chosen to be part of the

Normandie Impressionniste Festival 2013!

Last week the Scientific Committee of the Festival reviewed material from the book PISSARRO’S PLACES and gave it a place among a few other publications officially endorsed by the Festival!  They will soon place the book on their website on their Publications page. PISSARRO’S PLACES is, in fact, the only English-language book to be included.

The first Normandie Impressionniste Festival was held in 2010, and it took France by storm, drawing locals and tourists alike to a summer full of artistic events, including a superb art exhibition at the Musée des Beaux Arts in Rouen.

The 2013 Festival promises to surpass the last one, with four superb art exhibitions in museums at Rouen, Caen, Giverny, and Le Havre. PISSARRO’S PLACES fits  in with all the exhibitions, especially with the one at Musée Malraux in Le Havre, Pissarro and the Ports. In fact, a whole chapter of the book PISSARRO’S PLACES is devoted to the city of Le Havre and Pissarro’s experiences painting their harbors.

The Normandie Impressionniste Festival has an extraordinary website in French, English and a host of other languages that describes all the events that run from late April through September.  Check it out:  http://www.normandie-impressionniste.eu/

PISSARRO’S PLACES will be published in April.

Watch for news of a website and a book launch promotion.

PISSARRO IN NEW YORK AT THE FRICK

frick-2 Boulevard de Rochechouart, 1880

Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts

Pissarro seems to be everywhere this year–in Madrid at Museo Thyssen Bornemiszo, in Le Havre as part of the Normandie Impressionist Festival, and in this one work which is part of an exhibition at the Frick. PISSARRO’S PLACES are everywhere!
This work is not featured in the book, PISSARRO’S PLACES.  Take this marvelous opportunity to see it in person. Photos are never as good!
The Impressionist Line from Degas to Toulouse-Lautrec: Drawings and Prints from the Clark, March 12, 2013 to June 16, 2013
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A CLOSER LOOK
This beautiful pastel, Boulevard de Rochechouart, by Camille Pissarro deserves to be better known. This street is in the 9th arrondisement, an extension of the Boulevard de Clichy. He knew that area  well because his pied-a-terre in Paris was located in the 18th just a few blocks north. He was living there with Julie and his  family that winter.
What is interesting is that this work on paper was done relatively early in Pissarro’s career, in 1880. This is 13 years before Pissarro started his series of paintings in Paris.  Yet in this one, he seems to be looking down on the street as he did in 1893 at Place du Havre. It would seem to be a foreshadowing of his work to come.
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Here is an interesting perspective as noted in Art Daily of March 12 (See URL below for the whole story):

PISSARRO CHALLENGES NOTIONS OF FINISH Like Millet, Camille Pissarro spent much of his career depicting peasants and unembellished scenes of rural life, although the urban cityscape seized his imagination as well. His large pastel Boulevard de Rochechouart depicts a slice of Paris in the years following Baron Haussman’s renewal of the city. For the writers and artists of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the pulse and rhythm of the grands boulevards symbolized modernity, as eloquently expressed in Baudelaire’s famous essay of 1863 “Peintre de la Vie Moderne.” Through hatched, unblended strokes in a multitude of colors, Pissarro achieves a sense of transparency that captures the shifting sensations of a city in constant flux. His high viewpoint plunges the viewer into the melee of a tree-lined place, with carriages and omnibuses circulating and pedestrians dispersing into the streets. These anonymous urban dwellers dressed in dark clothing are mere blurs in the lively milieu, a world away from Millet’s monumental figure who commands the space of his environment. Although the pastel appears closer to a sketch than a completed work, Pissarro deliberately challenged accepted notions of finish. He signed and dated the sheet and exhibited it as an independent work alongside his paintings and smaller drawings in the Sixth Impressionist Exhibition of 1881.

More Information: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=11&int_new=61243#.UT9-kVegv0c[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org



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