Archive Page 2

PISSARRO — AN INTERNATIONAL FAVORITE

Self-Portrait, 1903

 

 

Are you one of the dozens of people who visited this Pissarro website in the past thirty days?

Visitors were from the following countries: United States, France, United Kingdom, Spain, Germany, Italy, Canada, Greece, Czech Republic, Australia, Ireland, India, New Zealand, Israel, Sweden, Republic of Korea, Brazil, Belgium, Thailand, South Africa, Finland, Netherlands, Hungary, Russian Federation, Poland, Slovakia, Indonesia, Phillippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Switzerland, United Arab Emirates.

If you were one of these, thank you and please visit the website often.

UPCOMING TALKS ON PISSARRO’S PLACES

Dobbs Ferry, NY Public Library, March 22, 2 pm

Harrison, NY Public Library, March 23, 2 pm

PISSARRO’S PLACES

http://www.pissarrosplaces.com

 

 

 

A Winter Landscape

The Banks of the Marne in Winter 1866 Art Institute of Chicago PDR 107

The Banks of the Marne in Winter 1866
Art Institute of Chicago PDR 107

This elegant painting by  Pissarro, which appeared in the Salon of 1866, must have looked very different from the others. It drew the attention of critics, one of whom called it a “vulgar view.” We know that Pissarro lived nearby. After he died, this picture was included in the inventory of his works and was called Landscape at La Varenne-Saint-Hilaire. He and his companion Julie were living there the previous spring, when their first daughter Jeanne Rachel was born.

But why this scene, which is so bleak, so empty? It is intriguing because of its mystery—it does not tell a story, does not pamper the eye. It is a tightly-woven geometric structure of horizontal and diagonal lines that pulls you into its web. Anchoring the painting is the straight line beginning with the river bank on the left of the canvas and meeting what we assume is a road with the horse and carriage, then extends through the smattering of houses to the right edge. In the midst of the dark green ground cover, a shorter line of dark earth extends to the right side. Midway up the mountain just below the white house on the crest of the hill is another dark line, presumably a road.

These three more or less parallel lines are slashed by the strong diagonal road leading from the left lower corner, accentuated by spindly leafless trees. A woman walks the other direction to draw our attention to the carriage with white horses at the corner. There are other diagonals, softer ones—the line of trees from the crest of the hill to a house below and a renegade dark line in the clouds above.

For Pissarro, it was enough. And for Emile Zola, a writer and art critic who was seeing Pissarro’s work for the first time, it also was enough. He wrote a long glowing review of the painting including the following comments: “…you ought to know that you please nobody and that your painting is thought to be too bare, too black. So why the devil do you have the arrant awkwardness to paint solidly and study nature so honestly!…Not the least delectation for the eye. A grave and austere kind of painting, an extreme care for truth and rightness, an iron will. You are a clumsy blunderer, sir —you are an artist that I like.”

Looking at a Pissarro painting is not always easy—he requires us to think, to look closely and to question what we see.  This is why his paintings are endlessly interesting.

The quote from Zola is taken from Pissarro:Critical Catalogue, Pissarro and Durand-Ruel Snollaerts (2005).

This painting is one of 35 paintings by Pissarro featured in the book PISSARRO’S PLACES www.pissarrosplaces.com

AUTHOR’S NOTE:  One winter day while returning on the train from Reims to Paris, I saw a line of hills that looked strikingly familiar, and even more so because of a bright green ground cover of some sort that extended from the railroad tracks to some houses. I quickly checked the GPS of my phone and found, much to my surprise, I was in the very area painted by Pissarro!  

PISSARRO in Australia

A Meadow at Eragny, 1886, PDR 829

A Meadow at Eragny, 1886, PDR 829

When Sotheby’s held their Impressionist sale last November, this blog featured their offering of seven paintings by Pissarro.  This was one of them, and it has a new home–in a museum on view for all of us to see for many years to come.

The Art Gallery of South Australia in Adelaide purchased this painting for their collection, according a story in THE AUSTRALIAN, Sydney’s daily newspaper. The Art Gallery, founded in 1881, has an outstanding collection of 38,000 works of art from Australia, Europe, North America, and Asia. Adelaide is the fifth largest city in Australia and is located on the southern coast west of Sydney.

Pissarro made this glorious painting in 1886 during the time he was experimenting with pointillism.  It’s a small painting, only 24 1/2 by 28 7/8 in. It is one of those that must be seen in person to get the full effect. Photographs cannot capture the delicate colors and myriad tiny brushstrokes. The apple tree is obviously the focal point. It is the largest object, just off center to the left, and it stands at a point where three different fields meet.

It’s autumn, judging by the golden trees in the background, and if you look carefully, you can see red apples on the tree. It is probably late afternoon. The full strength of the setting sun is clearly shown on the tree’s left side. Its shadow is almost long enough to reach the post some distance to the right. It’s hard to tell, but when you see it in person, the light in the sky graduates slowly from a clear blue at the top of the canvas to a light coral above the horizon.

Nothing is as good as seeing a Pissarro painting in person, especially this one. Australia, anyone?

PISSARRO in London at Sotheby’s–“An Exceptional Masterwork”

Boulevard Montmaratre, Spring Morning, 1897 PDR 1171

Boulevard Montmartre, Spring Morning, 1897
PDR 1171

Pissarro’s elegant painting, Boulevard Montmartre, Spring Morning is “one of the most important Impressionist masterworks to come to auction in the last decade,” according to Sotheby’s in London where it will be auctioned in February. The picture’s breathtaking beauty is matched by its amazing history.

Carol Vogel told the story in her New York Times column Inside Art on December 19, 2013:  Max Silberberg, a Jewish industrialist and collector from Breslau, Germany, owned it until the Nazis forced the sale of his collection; he was killed in the Holocaust. It was sold at auction in Berlin in 1935, and had several owners until 1960, when the Manhattan gallery Knoedler & Company sold it to John and Frances L. Loeb, philanthropists from New York. They gave the painting to the Israel Museum after Mr. Loeb’s death in 1996.

But after Gerta Silberberg, the daughter-in-law of Max Silberberg, filed a claim, the museum returned the painting to her; she allowed the museum to display it on long-term loan. Earlier this year, Ms. Silberberg died and her estate is selling the painting.

Pissarro’s dealer Durand-Ruel encouraged him to paint the large boulevards of Paris.  From February to April 1897, he lived and painted in a room with a clear view of Boulevard Montmartre on the left and the Boulevard des Italiens on the right. He made fourteen paintings of Boulevard Montmartre, depicting almost every possible weather condition from pounding rain to bright sunshine. This painting depicts one of those rare spring days when the  sunlight falling on the street creates lacy shadows through the fringe of new leaves on the young trees.

Sotheby’s  http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/BID/2877520219x0x714973/6677a87c-a218-48ed-b435-e649f6d21233/714973.pdf

PISSARRO in Detroit……for now.

The Path, 1889 Camille Pissarro, PDR 871 Detroit Institute of Art

The Path, 1889
Camille Pissarro, PDR 871
Detroit Institute of Art

This beautiful pointillist painting by Pissarro at Detroit Institute of Art is one of those owned by the City of Detroit and may be caught in the middle of the city’s bankruptcy.

According to an article in the Washington Post (December 16, 2013) “Christie’s, which has been poring over the collection for months, said it will include recommendations for how Detroit might make money while maintaining ownership of some of its most valuable pieces — including Degas’ ”Dancers in the Green Room,” Pissarro’s “The Path” and Renoir’s “Graziella.” But the city may have to sell off works many consider integral to the cultural soul of the city in order to help repay creditors, including retired public workers whose pensions could take a huge hit.”  

It is ironic that Pissarro himself was in a terrible financial crunch during the time that he painted this picture. In May of 1889, he wrote, “Business (since it always comes down to that) is catastrophic.”  The following year, he became disenchanted with pointillism, and abandoned Neo-Impressionism.

This painting is not one of Pissarro’s more familiar paintings. It has been included in only four exhibitions, the most recent one in Japan in 1990. But it demonstrates his amazing technical ability which literally pours the rigidity of pointillism into sheer poetry.

Pissarro cleverly uses pointilism’s dot to convey the multicolored autumn trees. But it is the overall composition which grabs our attention. The entire right side of the canvas is virtually “in our face,” filling the foreground with the windowless side of a house and a massive tree whose branches fill the canvas top. While we cling to the green embankment, we see the path extending around a curve to more houses and hills in the distance. The variegated sky adds a sense of uncertainty.

Clearly, this is not a painting we absorb in one glance–there is much to examine and ponder. Let’s hope that the City of Detroit will have time to reconsider “The Path” and that it will be included in future exhibitions shown around the world.

Information on Pissarro’s life and this painting is from Pissarro:Critical Catalogue by Joachim Pissarro and Claire Durand-Ruel Snollaerts (2005).

The Camille Pissarro Rose

Camille Pissarro Rose

Camille Pissarro Rose

There is a rose named for Camille Pissarro.  It was bred by G. Delbard in France in 1996. It is a glorious flower with yellow, pink, and cream stripes.  The one in the picture was part of a small bouquet given to me a few years ago.

Info from: http://nixpixmix.blogspot.com/2012/04/camille-pissaro-rose.html

Roses of Nice — PISSARRO in Barcelona

Image

Roses of Nice, 1902

Private Collection  PDR 1426

Camille Pissarro did not paint bouquets of flowers very often, but those he created are masterful. This one, featured in the PISSARRO exhibition in Barcelona, is a real treasure. Six pale pink roses, stand in a crystal vase, fully open and almost ready to drop their petals. The pale pink is highlighted with a creamy white that gives the flowers an inner glow. The vase sits on the lower level of a highly-polished chest. In the background, two paintings hang on the wall, but it is unclear whether they are Pissarro’s work. The one on the left hangs a little crooked and appears to include mountains. Could it be a Cezanne?

Pissarro must have made this painting in the spring of 1902, because in May he donated it to a sale at the Drouot auction house benefiting the widow of an artist friend.  Since he was always very specific in the names of paintings, we wonder about this one which clearly indicates that the pink roses are from Nice. At that time, Pissarro and his family were living in Paris on the Ile-de-la-Cité in an apartment facing Pont Neuf. The flowers may have come from Le Marché aux Fleurs, the flower market that has supplied flowers to the neighborhood since 1808.  While the market probably had roses in early spring (there are always roses in flower shops in Paris), would Pissarro have known where they were from?  Would he have bought them or would Julie have picked them up during her shopping trip?

When I saw this painting with Robert Froh, an American artist living in Barcelona, he suggested a more interesting idea.  Perhaps they were brought to the Pissarro family from Nice by Henri Matisse, who was living in Nice in 1902. Pissarro met Matisse at Durand-Ruel’s gallery in Paris in 1897.  According to Pissarro; Critical Catalogue (2005), “Though he never worked with Pissarro, Matisse benefited from his advice, found in him an attentive teacher and came under his influence for awhile.” Matisse visited Pissarro at his apartment on  Rue de Rivoli and watched him create his paintings of the Tuileries gardens (Pissarro: His Life and Work, 1980). So it is entirely possible that he came to Paris to visit Pissarro, bringing roses from Nice as a gift.  And it obviously pleased Pissarro to remember those roses in this lovely painting.

Robert Froh is from MIlwaukee, Wisconsin and has lived in Barcelona for a number of years. Take a look at his work: http://robertfroh.com/

The PISSARRO exhibition will be on view at the CaixaForum in Barcelona until mid-January. PISSARRO’S PLACES is available at the CaixaForum and also at the Excellence bookstore during the exhibition.



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